Li Chi Slays the Dragon — from Bodies Alive!

 

 

See the video: Li Chi Slays the Dragon from Bodies Alive! 

An ancient Chinese legend brought to life on painted bodies.

LIChiSlaysTheDragon-2015_BodiesAlive_title1

Li Chi Slays the Dragon is one of the stories I tell most frequently. Mostly as a StoryFace, illustrating the tale on the face of one volunteer as I tell it, but, once upon a time, I had the chance to expand the story onto a cast of performers as a tale told with painted bodies. This video is from that performance at the Face and Body Art International Convention in 2008, as part of the Bodies Alive! show we presented there. I was joined in the painting by Christina Davison, Sara Glasgow, and Jennifer Wade, with help from some volunteers, and in performance by Blair Woodward, Cully Firmin, Rebecca Reil and Chloe Agostino. See my StoryFace version of Li Chi live at PIFA. Learn about the Bodies Alive Show. Learn about BodyStories.

My specific inspiration for how to take a legend like this and turn it into a sequence of images on painted bodies came from a puppet show I saw at the New Victory Theatre by Ping Chong, adapting to the stage Japanese ghost stories from the classic movie Kwaidan. Ping Chong’s stage design re-created a cinematic style, varying the size of the puppets and the perspective of the settings he placed them in to do closeups, or long shots or tracking shots, to tell the story sequentially — like in a movie.

The development process included sketches of the body designs which I scanned and then moved around in photoshop to create a rough storyboard, plus some color and design tests done in the course of my regular facepainting gigs. To help the performers understand the visuals that their painted bodies would create on stage, I sketched the designs onto T-shirts for them to wear during rehearsals. Included here are the studio photos taken at FABAIC by Rich Johnson, plus some of the other images created during the process, and since.

learn about all that we do at: agostinoarts.com

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Henri Matisse The Cut-Outs — Transformations Gallery

Matisse - The Circus, 1947

Matisse – The Circus, 1947

Matisse — Jazz

It is easy to be inspired by Matisse. Seeing Henri Matisse the Cut-Outs exhibit at MOMA, the exuberance of color, the freedom of forms — you want to be able to paint like that. The later rooms with the wall-sized works, and especially the photographs of how his studio was so full of this art as he created it — you want to live in rooms like that. I walked out of the exhibit wanting to play with color, to hold it in my hand and create pure forms with it as he did. Even if you don’t like Matisse, you have to be inspired by the absolute passion he had for creating art, so undeniable that it that led him to invent a new way to make art when he could no longer paint. MatisseCat_6g-fhd4--040727_agostinoartsChapter 10 of my book is titled “Matisse’s Cat”, in reference to the inspiration I draw from these struggles of great artists to find a way to satisfy that passion, and Matisse particularly because he spoke of the struggle, and left us evidence of his explorations and battles with line and form and color. I was writing about my own struggles to develop new cat face designs, particularly one based on a statue at the Bronx Zoo of a puma coming down a cliff, and in this iteration I had simplified the puma shape so much that it reminded me of a Matisse cut-out, and that encouraged me to loosen my hold on the realistic image and pursue it’s essence instead. This is the encouragement I take from Matisse: aim for the essential.

Matisse — Blue Dancer

We paint faces mostly with pure color. You might do blending in the sponge work, but then the imagery on top is usually solid colors with minimal shading — so the Cut-Outs relate directly. In adapting the Cut-Out figures to a face you have the additional playfulness of trying to fit his forms to the shapes of the face, which becomes an exercise in the fundamental skill of placing a flat image over the curves of the face. And I do mean “exercise” — I learn more about painting faces when I try to imitate the Cut-Outs.

Matisse - The Rumanian Blouse 1940

The Rumanian Blouse 1940

Matisse_RoumanianBlouse_artface_140920_agostinoartsMatisse’s painted portraits also adapt well, as he worked often with flat areas of pure color and precise linework. Strong colors and clean linework make for effective faces.

 

 

Face Gallery (Body Paintings below) ——————————————

at FABAIC 2011

at FABAIC 2011

Matisse-Icarus 2011

Matisse-Icarus 2011

Matisse-Icarus 2011

Matisse-Icarus 2011

Matisse Remix 2008

Matisse Remix 2008

Portrait of the Artist's Wife, 1912

Portrait of the Artist’s Wife, 1912

Red Fish 1911

Red Fish 1911

Matisse Remix 2008

Matisse Remix 2008

Matisse Remix 2008

Matisse Remix 2008

Matisse Inspired bodypainting by Raphealle Fieldhouse

Matisse Inspired bodypainting by Raphealle Fieldhouse

New York Knicks — Basketball Face and Body Painting Gallery

TransformationsFaceGrid_KNICKS_agostinoarts

 

Knicks_FaceOnWebsite_Screen shot 2013-05-01 at 11.08.59 PM-cropThe New York Knicks went to the NBA playoffs in 2013 and our Transformations artists were part of a number of special playoff events, including body painting 5 fans for the #CrazyNYK Fan Race to Times Square and painting the public for special Knicks events at Chase Bank locations around NYC. basketballKnicks_sketches1_130501I watched a game using the dvr pause button to sketch shots and dunks to explore face designs with players in action, to add to the stadium style faces we paint for sports events with big logos and team colors. I also adapted the NY skyline design I do for one real Crazy Fan who showed up in head-to-toe Knicks regalia, and he wound up as the poster child for the events on the Knicks website.

 

NY Knicks Crazy Fan Face Gallery:

After the first few events where we painted faces for Crazy Fan contests, we got a call asking if we could body paint 5 fan contestants for a race from Madison Square Garden to Times Square to win playoff tickets. In addition to my photos here there is a slideshow the Knicks posted with photos from the full process.

learn about all we do at:  http://agostinoarts.com/

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StoryFaces and Body Painting at NYSATA 2013

At this year’s New York State Art Teacher’s Association Conference (NYSATA) I had the opportunity to do a presentation on my StoryFaces Mask Arts programs, which included performing a few stories from the assembly programs I do in schools, and we went through “Designing Tribal Masks Project”, an example of one of my classroom workshop programs, along with this sample handout: .StoryFaces_MaskArts_TribalMaskProject_agostinoarts

As the tiger leapt through the walls of fire, he began to burn with a flame of his own...

As the tiger leapt through the walls of fire, he began to burn with a flame of his own…

For one of their Friday After Dark workshops I offered “Face and Body Painting 101”, so during the day I also painted a model in the exhibit area as an example. It’s a design of familiar elements, from my story “The Tiger That Went to the House of the Sun”, which I would be telling that afternoon in the StoryFaces session. TigerBody_iPad_1_131122_agostinoartsThe open lobby area we were in was  too chilly for my volunteer model, so I limited the painting to from 10:00 am to 12:30.

TigerBody_iPad_3_131122_agostinoartsTigerBody_front1_131122c-detail

 

 

 

 

 

 

Face and Body Painting 101 at NYSATA

Face and Body Painting 101 at NYSATA

We also had a couple of volunteer models along with 14 participants for the Face and Body painting workshop that night, and I think everyone enjoyed themselves.

Workshop_FAD-NYSATA_2bp_131122c_agostinoarts

Workshop_FAD-NYSATA_group1_131122c_agostinoarts

 

Learn more about my school programs at:

Christopher Agostino’s StoryFaces

StoryFaces — Mask Art Workshops

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How to do Zombie Make-up — Quick, Step-By-Step Face Painting Instructions

Our Transformations technique is to create bold face designs that look exciting both from across the room and up close, based on our studies of theatrical makeup and world mask concepts. We work fast to paint as many people at an event as possible — a face like this zombie would take 3 minutes — so we do take shortcuts and simplify techniques (such as shading), and are less concerned about how a face looks in a foto as we are about it’s effect seen live. At a recent event I took these step-by-step fotos on a guest as I painted him.

zombiehowto_1base_131016c_agostinoarts  STEP 1: BASE — With a sponge, put a solid base color over the whole face (except the eyelids). Use any medium shade: grey is classic zombie, but can be green, blue or others. (See below for info on the makeup, brushes and sponges we use — and also for a pdf of a green zombie and other variations)

 

 

 

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zombiehowto_2shading_131016c_agostinoarts STEP 2: SHADING — Add shading to exaggerate the sunken parts of the face: the eye sockets, the sides of the nose, the lines from the edge of the nose going around the mouth, the hollows on the cheeks and chin. Generally with horror make-up, you want to make the face more dramatic looking by putting shadows into the sunken, fleshy parts of the face and highlights on the bony parts (step 3). I do my shading by painting thin lines with black liquid make-up, then “pulling” those lines with a large soft brush to blend them into the grey base. You can also do your shading with the edge of a sponge — a triangular sponge works well for that.

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zombiehowto_3highlights_131016c_agostinoarts  STEP 3: HIGHLIGHTS — In this step I use a sponge to lightly put white makeup onto the bridge of the nose, the cheek bones, chin and forehead, to increase the sculpting of the face.

I also put a bright color (yellow in this case) onto the eyelids to begin to make his zombie eyes.

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zombiehowto_4eyesmouth_131016c_agostinoarts  STEP 4: EYES & MOUTH — I add a red spot for the eyes and black to create the open mouth shape. It’s part of the style that I work in that the mouth is kind of loose and jagged — I like my monster faces to look “ill-formed”, not too precise.

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zombiehowto_5details_131016c_agostinoarts  STEP 5: FINAL DETAILS and EXPRESSIVE LINES — In this case I gave him small pointy teeth with some red dots for blood. I used what I term “expressive lines” to give his eyes an angrier look — they same kind of line techniques a cartoonist would use to change the expressions of an illustration can create the modern, fast type angry zombie or, with different eye lines, the old-fashioned shambling type zombie (in this case, I modeled off of those furrowed brows they always give the Hulk when he’s angry in comic books).

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zombieeyes_131016c_agostinoartsZOMBIE VARIATIONS —  Starting from this basic formula of using shading and highlights to make the face dramatic, using bizarre colors, and adding playful details like a gory mouth and zombie eyes, you can make a whole range of zombies, monsters, and other horror make-ups. The blue shaded zombie here was also painted at the same event. See the 3  previous posts for galleries of Halloween faces and variations.

Click here for a printable pdf of the step-by-step for a green zombie, and some examples of variations:

Halloween_ZombieHowTo_agostinoarts

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Kit-060507eMAKE-UP AND TOOLS — There are a  lot of good face painting make-ups available today, so please be sure to get a safe, comfortable make-up product for any facepainting. Never use paint on someone’s skin, even paints that say they are non-toxic — always use make-up.

The brand we prefer is Kryolan’s Aquacolor because of the vivid colors, ease of application and removal, and how comfortable they are to wear. Learn more on our web page http://agostinoarts.com/AboutTheMakeup including where you can get quality make-ups in the NYC area and online. And check out my book: Transformations! The Story Behind the Painted Faces

I apply the Aquacolors with sponges and brushes. I prefer the round craft-type sponges and synthetic sable watercolor brushes.

Learn about all that we do at: agostinoarts.com

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